RE: [PipingDesign] Struts

From: <Steve>
Date: Tue Sep 23 2003 - 09:26:00 EDT

Aha

I think its just words. What you call a strut I call a hanger. Every book I have including the dreaded "piping guide" refers to struts as being primarily compression loaded.
If you call a tension member a strut, there will be a lot of confusion. A member designed for tensile load can be also loaded in compression but the capacity is normally much lower.
It would be dangerous to assume that a member rated for a tensile load can carry the same load in compression. With ductile members that have a high moment of inertia compared to their length (short and fat) then the difference may be small. However if long and thin, as many pipe hangers are, then buckling may occur.
You need to work it out i.e. do the sums.

Cheers

Steve McKenzie

-----Original Message-----
From: Tushar Rajyaguru [mailto:trajyagu@ltcis.ltindia.com] Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2003 1:03 AM To: piping design
Subject: RE: [PipingDesign] Struts

Hi Steve,

I am bit confused and I think I am misunderstood. My query is about strut support and not Column/strut (structural members). The strut support consists of rigid body with ball bushing joint as a connection at both the ends. One end is connected with pipe with clamp and other with the structure. Normally Struts have very high load bearing capacity.

Hi Tushar Rajyaguru

A strut is by normal definition a compression member. Same as a column. If

you have only used tension members, there is a bit more work involved in

strut design. You need to consider end conditions and analyse for buckling.

Also struts do not like eccentric loads, so avoid where you can. They are

fairly well covered in most textbooks although the end conditions/degree of

fixity when is used to estimate the equivalent length can take some time.

Transverse loads also need to be taken into account e.g. seismics, wind etc.

They can have a big influence as they induce a moment the same as an

eccentric load does.

Cheers

Steve McKenzie

-----Original Message-----

From: Tushar Rajyaguru [mailto:trajyagu@ltcis.ltindia.com]

Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2003 12:14 AM

To: piping design

Subject: [PipingDesign] Struts

Dear Friends,

We are planning to use strut in one piping system. My query is whether strut

can take compressive load ? Generally we have used it in tension only.


"NO EFFORT IN LIFE GOES UNPAID, HENCE GO AHEAD"


Tushar K. Rajyaguru

Plant & Piping Engineering,

Larsen & Toubro - Chiyoda Ltd.,

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Discussion List sponsor: The fluid flow calculations website - www.LMNOeng.com - LMNO Engineering, Research, and Software, Ltd.

Information presented on this list is given as helpful advice, nonsense, carefully-considered calulation or any combination of the above. The intent is to spark discussion and encourage knowledge-sharing amongst professionals. If you blow yourself up by doing stuff remotely described by info gleaned from reading this list, you are an idiot.

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ Received on Tue Sep 23 09:26:00 2003

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